GAO Survey on How Local Areas Guide WIA Participants Toward Training

U.S. Government Accountability Office

Introduction

  The U.S. Government Accountability Office (GAO), an agency of the U.S. Congress, is conducting a study on how local workforce areas guide WIA Adult and Dislocated Worker Program participants toward training for available jobs and potential high-growth occupations.

As part of this review, we are conducting a web-based survey of randomly selected Workforce Investment Boards. We will be asking you about how your local area identifies available jobs and potential high-growth occupations so that you can guide participants toward training for such jobs, the resources most useful in doing so, and challenges in guiding participants toward training.

Your participation in our study is essential for us to inform the Congress about how local areas prepare participants for currently and soon-to-be available jobs. The results of this survey generally will be provided in summary form in a GAO report. Individual answers may be discussed in our reporting, but we will not include any information that could be used to identify individuals' or WIBs' names. We will not release individually identifiable data outside of GAO, unless compelled by law or requested by the Congress.

We estimate that this survey will take about 60 minutes to complete. Please complete this survey within 2 weeks. You do not need to complete the survey in one sitting, as the survey will allow you at any point to save your responses so that you can log in again and complete the rest of it at a later time. To answer these questions, please consult with staff at the local administrative entity and/or American Job Centers (formerly known as one-stop career centers) if necessary. To learn more about completing the questionnaire, printing your responses, and whom to contact if you have questions, click here for help.

Thank you for your time and assistance.

(View responses)
 

Part I: Characteristics of your local workforce area

1.  Please verify the following information for your WIB.
(View responses)
 
  Is this the correct name of your WIB: ______?
(View responses)
 
  What is the correct WIB name?
 
(View responses)
 
  Is this the correct city and state of your WIB: ______, ______?
(View responses)
 
  What is the correct city and state for your WIB?
 
(View responses)
 
2.  Please tell us about your local workforce area.
(View responses)
 
a.  Approximately how many case managers worked with WIA Adult and Dislocated Worker participants in your local workforce area in calendar year 2012?
  case managers
(View responses)
 
b.  Approximately how many sites (including American Job Centers, affiliate satellite centers, and temporary sites) offered WIA services in your local workforce area in calendar year 2012?
  sites
(View responses)
 
c.  Approximately how many of these sites were located in each of the following areas in calendar year 2012? (Please enter one response for each row or check don't know.)
(View responses)
 
 
Number of sites
Don't know
  Areas with a population of at least 50,000
(View responses)
   
(View responses)
 
(View responses)
  Areas with populations of at least 2,500 but less than 50,000
(View responses)
   
(View responses)
 
(View responses)
  Areas with a population of less than 2,500
(View responses)
   
(View responses)
 
(View responses)
 
d.  In your estimation, how did the unemployment rate in your local workforce area compare to the national average of 8.1% in calendar year 2012?
(View responses)
 
3.  Is your organization the administrative entity (one-stop operator) for your local workforce area?
(View responses)
 
  If no, what is the name of the local administrative entity?
 
(View responses)
 
4.  What type of training do staff in your local workforce area primarily guide eligible WIA Adult and Dislocated Worker participants toward?
(View responses)
 
5.  Does your local workforce area use an industry sector strategy (e.g., identifying high-demand and growing industry sectors, including employer needs) to guide participants toward training for potential high-growth occupations?
(View responses)
 

Part II: Local initiatives for identifying available jobs and potential high-growth occupations

 
To guide WIA Adult and Dislocated Worker participants toward training for available jobs and potential high-growth occupations, local areas must identify those jobs and the skills needed for them. Listed below are several initiatives that local areas might undertake to identify available jobs, potential high-growth occupations, and the skills needed for those jobs.
(View responses)
 
6.  Did your local area undertake any local initiatives to identify available jobs, potential high-growth occupations, and the skills needed for those jobs (i.e., purchasing real-time labor market information, surveying employers, partnering with the economic development agency, etc.)?
(click here to go to Part III: Other sources for identifying available jobs)
(View responses)
 
a.  Why did your local area not undertake any local initiatives to identify available jobs, potential high-growth occupations, and the skills needed for those jobs (i.e., purchasing real-time labor market information, surveying employers, partnering with the economic development agency, etc.)?
(check all that apply)
(View responses)
 
  What was the other reason(s)?
 
(View responses)
 
  What type of information did your local area obtain from the state labor market information office, state workforce agency, or state or local economic development agency?
(check all that apply)
(View responses)
 
  What was the other information?
 
(View responses)
 
  After responding to question 6a, click on the Save and continue button at the bottom of the page to go on to question 12. You do not need to answer questions 7 through 11.
(View responses)
 
7.  Did your local area purchase real-time labor market information in calendar year 2012?
(View responses)
 
  For what purpose did your local area purchase real-time labor market information?
(check all that apply)
(View responses)
 
  What was the other purpose?
 
(View responses)
 
  How useful was real-time labor market information for these purposes?
(View responses)
 
  Which of the following sources of funding did your local area use for this initiative?
(check all that apply)
(View responses)
 
  What was the other source of funding?
 
(View responses)
 
  Approximately how much did it cost your local area to purchase real-time labor market information in calendar year 2012?
$ 
(View responses)
 
  Why did your local area not purchase real-time labor market information?
(check all that apply)
(View responses)
 
  What was the other reason(s)?
 
(View responses)
 
8.  Did your local area develop or maintain a partnership(s) with the local economic development agency in calendar year 2012? (Note: This includes both formal and informal partnerships.)
(View responses)
 
  For what purpose did your local area develop or maintain a partnership(s) with the local economic development agency?
(check all that apply)
(View responses)
 
  What was the other purpose?
 
(View responses)
 
  How useful was this partnership(s) with the local economic development agency for these purposes?
(View responses)
 
  Which of the following sources of funding did your local area use for this initiative?
(check all that apply)
(View responses)
 
  What was the other source of funding?
 
(View responses)
 
  Why did your local area not develop or maintain partnership(s) with the local economic development agency?
(check all that apply)
(View responses)
 
  What was the other reason(s)?
 
(View responses)
 
9.  Did your local area survey local employers about their hiring plans or skill needs in calendar year 2012?
(View responses)
 
  For what purpose did your local area survey local employers?
(check all that apply)
(View responses)
 
  What was the other purpose?
 
(View responses)
 
  How useful were surveys of local employers for these purposes?
(View responses)
 
  Which of the following sources of funding did your local area use for this initiative?
(check all that apply)
(View responses)
 
  What was the other source of funding?
 
(View responses)
 
  Approximately how much did it cost your local area to survey local employers in calendar year 2012?
$ 
(View responses)
 
  Why did your local area not survey local employers?
(check all that apply)
(View responses)
 
  What was the other reason(s)?
 
(View responses)
 
10.  Did your local area hold discussions or focus groups with employers about their hiring plans or skill needs in calendar year 2012?
(View responses)
 
  For what purpose did your local area hold discussions or focus groups with employers?
(check all that apply)
(View responses)
 
  What was the other purpose?
 
(View responses)
 
  How useful were discussions or focus groups with employers for these purposes?
(View responses)
 
  Which of the following sources of funding did your local area use for this initiative?
(check all that apply)
(View responses)
 
  What was the other source of funding?
 
(View responses)
 
  Why did your local area not hold discussions or focus groups with employers?
(check all that apply)
(View responses)
 
  What was the other reason(s)?
 
(View responses)
 
11.  Did your local area undertake any other type of initiative to identify available jobs or potential high-growth occupations in order to guide WIA Adult and Dislocated Worker participants toward training for such jobs in calendar year 2012?
(View responses)
 
  What was this initiative(s)?
 
(View responses)
 
  Which of the following sources of funding did your local area use for this initiative?
(check all that apply)
(View responses)
 
  What was the other source of funding?
 
(View responses)
 

Part III: Other sources for identifying available jobs

 
To guide WIA Adult and Dislocated Worker participants toward training for available jobs, WIB staff (i.e., executive directors, program managers, coordinators, or administrators) or case managers must identify available jobs and the skills needed for those jobs. Listed below are several sources of information that staff might use to identify available jobs and the skills needed for those jobs.
(View responses)
 
12.  In order to guide WIA Adult and Dislocated Worker participants toward training, do staff in your local area use information about available jobs?
(click here to go to Part IV: Other sources for identifying potential high-growth occupations)
(View responses)
 
a.  In order to guide WIA participants toward training, which staff are responsible for identifying available jobs and related skill requirements?
(check all that apply)
(View responses)
 
b.  Why do staff in your local area not use information about available jobs to guide WIA participants toward training?
(check all that apply)
(View responses)
 
  What was the other reason(s)?
 
(View responses)
 
  After responding to question 12b, click on the Save and continue button at the bottom of the page to go on to question 18. You do not need to answer questions 13 through 17.
(View responses)
 
13.  To what extent did staff in your local area use state job banks to identify available jobs and the skills needed for those jobs in calendar year 2012?
(View responses)
 
  How useful were state job banks for identifying available jobs and the skills needed for those jobs in calendar year 2012?
(View responses)
 
  Which of the following are reasons that state job banks were somewhat or not at all useful in identifying available jobs and the skills needed for those jobs?
(check all that apply)
(View responses)
 
  What was the other reason(s)?
 
(View responses)
 
  Why did staff in your local area not use state job banks?
(check all that apply)
(View responses)
 
  What was the other reason(s)?
 
(View responses)
 
  Why did staff in your local area not find state job banks useful for identifying available jobs and the skills needed for those jobs?
(check all that apply)
(View responses)
 
  What was the other reason(s)?
 
(View responses)
 
14.  To what extent did staff in your local area use online job postings (e.g. Monster.com, CareerBuilder.com, or individual company websites) to identify available jobs and the skills needed for those jobs in calendar year 2012?
(View responses)
 
  How useful were online job postings for identifying available jobs and the skills needed for those jobs in calendar year 2012?
(View responses)
 
  Which of the following are reasons that online job postings were somewhat or not at all useful in identifying available jobs and the skills needed for those jobs?
(check all that apply)
(View responses)
 
  What was the other reason(s)?
 
(View responses)
 
  Why did staff in your local area not use online job postings?
(check all that apply)
(View responses)
 
  What was the other reason(s)?
 
(View responses)
 
  Why did staff in your local area not find state job banks useful for identifying available jobs and the skills needed for those jobs?
(check all that apply)
(View responses)
 
  What was the other reason(s)?
 
(View responses)
 
15.  To what extent did staff in your local area use job vacancy surveys from the state labor market information office (i.e., surveys of employers about their number of job openings) to identify available jobs and the skills needed for those jobs in calendar year 2012? (Note: Not all states conduct job vacancy surveys.)
(View responses)
 
  How useful were these job vacancy surveys for identifying available jobs and the skills needed for those jobs in calendar year 2012?
(View responses)
 
  Which of the following are reasons that these job vacancy surveys were somewhat or not at all useful in identifying available jobs and the skills needed for those jobs?
(check all that apply)
(View responses)
 
  What was the other reason(s)?
 
(View responses)
 
  Why did staff in your local area not use these job vacancy surveys?
(check all that apply)
(View responses)
 
  What was the other reason(s)?
 
(View responses)
 
  Why did staff in your local area not find these job vacancy surveys useful for identifying available jobs and the skills needed for those jobs?
(check all that apply)
(View responses)
 
  What was the other reason(s)?
 
(View responses)
 
16.  Did staff in your local area use any other sources of information to identify available jobs and the skills needed for those jobs in calendar year 2012?
(View responses)
 
  What were the other sources?
 
(View responses)
 
17.  What else do you think we should know about the sources of information your local area finds useful for identifying available jobs and related skill requirements so that you can guide WIA Adult and Dislocated Worker participants toward training?
(View responses)
 

Part IV: Other sources for identifying potential high-growth occupations

 
To guide WIA Adult and Dislocated Worker participants toward training for potential high-growth occupations, WIB staff (i.e., executive directors, program managers, coordinators, or administrators) or case managers must identify potential high-growth occupations and the skills needed for those jobs.
(View responses)
 
18.  In order to guide WIA Adult and Dislocated Worker participants toward training, do staff in your local area use information about potential high-growth occupations?
(click here to skip to question 29)
(View responses)
 
a.  Why do staff in your local area not use information about potential high-growth occupations to guide WIA participants toward training?
(check all that apply)
(View responses)
 
  What was the other reason(s)?
 
(View responses)
 
  After responding to question 18a, click on the Save and continue button at the bottom of the page to go on to question 29. You do not need to answer questions 19 through 28.
(View responses)
 
19.  How do case managers in your local area know which jobs are considered potential high-growth occupations in your local area?
(check all that apply)
(View responses)
 
  How else do case managers know which jobs are considered potential high-growth occupations in your local area?
(View responses)
 

Information from U.S. Department of Labor

 
Listed below are several sources of information from the U.S Department of Labor that WIB staff (i.e., executive directors, program managers, coordinators, or administrators) or case managers in your local area might use to identify potential high-growth occupations and the skills needed for those jobs so that they may guide WIA Adult and Dislocated Worker participants toward training for such jobs.
(View responses)
 
20.  To what extent did staff in your local area use ONET to identify high-growth occupations or the skills needed for those jobs in calendar year 2012? (http://www.onetonline.org)
(View responses)
 
  How useful was ONET for identifying high-growth occupations or the skills needed for those jobs?
(View responses)
 
  Which of the following are reasons that ONET was somewhat or not at all useful in identifying high-growth occupations or the skills needed for those jobs?
(check all that apply)
(View responses)
 
  What was the other reason(s)?
 
(View responses)
 
  Why did staff in your local area not use ONET?
(check all that apply)
(View responses)
 
  What was the other reason(s)?
 
(View responses)
 
  Why did staff not find ONET useful for identifying high-growth occupations and the skills needed for those jobs?
(check all that apply)
(View responses)
 
  What was the other reason(s)?
 
(View responses)
 
21.  To what extent did staff in your local area use America's Career InfoNet (also known as Career One Stop) to identify high-growth occupations and the skills needed for those jobs in calendar year 2012? (http://www.careerinfonet.org)
(View responses)
 
  How useful was America's Career InfoNet (also known as Career One Stop) for identifying high-growth occupations and the skills needed for those jobs?
(View responses)
 
  Which of the following are reasons that America's Career InfoNet was somewhat or not at all useful in identifying high-growth occupations and the skills needed for those jobs?
(check all that apply)
(View responses)
 
  What was the other reason(s)?
 
(View responses)
 
  Why did staff in your local area not use America's Career InfoNet (also known as Career One Stop)?
(check all that apply)
(View responses)
 
  What was the other reason(s)?
 
(View responses)
 
  Why did staff not find America's Career InfoNet useful for identifying high-growth occupations and the skills needed for those jobs?
(check all that apply)
(View responses)
 
  What was the other reason(s)?
 
(View responses)
 
22.  Did staff in your local area use any other sources of information from the U.S. Department of Labor to identify potential high-growth occupations and the skills needed for those jobs in calendar year 2012?
(View responses)
 
  What were the other sources?
 
(View responses)
 

Information from state labor market information office

 
Listed below are several sources of information from the state labor market information office that staff in your local area might use to identify potential high-growth occupations and the skills needed for those jobs.
(View responses)
 
23.  To the best of your knowledge, does your state employ Regional Labor Market Analysts/Economists? (Note: Not all states employ Regional Labor Market Analysts/Economists.)
(View responses)
 
  To what extent did WIB staff consult with a Regional Labor Market Analyst/Economist to identify high-growth occupations in your local area in calendar year 2012?
(View responses)
 
  How useful was the information provided by the Regional Labor Market Analyst/Economist for identifying high-growth occupations and the skills needed for those jobs?
(View responses)
 
  Which of the following are reasons that the information provided by the Regional Labor Market Analyst/Economist was somewhat or not at all useful in identifying high-growth occupations and the skills needed for those jobs?
(check all that apply)
(View responses)
 
  What was the other reason(s)?
 
(View responses)
 
  Why did WIB staff not consult with a Regional Labor Market Analyst/Economist?
(check all that apply)
(View responses)
 
  What was the other reason(s)?
 
(View responses)
 
  Why did WIB staff not find the information provided by the Regional Labor Market Analyst/Economist useful for identifying high-growth occupations and the skills needed for those jobs?
(check all that apply)
(View responses)
 
  What was the other reason(s)?
 
(View responses)
 
24.  To what extent did staff in your local area use state industry and occupational projections from the state labor market information office to identify high-growth occupations and the skills needed for those jobs in calendar year 2012?
(View responses)
 
  How useful were state industry and occupational projections for identifying high-growth occupations and the skills needed for those jobs in calendar year 2012?
(View responses)
 
  Which of the following are reasons that state industry and occupational projections were somewhat or not at all useful in identifying high-growth occupations and the skills needed for those jobs?
(check all that apply)
(View responses)
 
  What was the other reason(s)?
 
(View responses)
 
  Why did staff in your local area not use state industry and occupational projections?
(check all that apply)
(View responses)
 
  What was the other reason(s)?
 
(View responses)
 
  Why did staff not find state industry and occupational projections useful for identifying high-growth occupations and the skills needed for those jobs?
(check all that apply)
(View responses)
 
  What was the other reason(s)?
 
(View responses)
 
25.  To what extent did staff in your local area use regional or local industry and occupational projections from the state labor market information office to identify high-growth occupations and the skills needed for those jobs in calendar year 2012?
(View responses)
 
  How useful were regional or local industry and occupational projections for identifying high-growth occupations and the skills needed for those jobs in calendar year 2012?
(View responses)
 
  Which of the following are reasons that regional or local industry and occupational projections were somewhat or not at all useful in identifying high-growth occupations and the skills needed for those jobs?
(check all that apply)
(View responses)
 
  What was the other reason(s)?
 
(View responses)
 
  Why did staff in your local area not use regional or local industry and occupational projections?
(check all that apply)
(View responses)
 
  What was the other reason(s)?
 
(View responses)
 
  Why did staff not find regional or local industry and occupational projections useful for identifying high-growth occupations and the skills needed for those jobs?
(check all that apply)
(View responses)
 
  What was the other reason(s)?
 
(View responses)
 
26.  To what extent did staff in your local area use customized reports and tools from the state labor market information office to identify high-growth occupations and the skills needed for those jobs in calendar year 2012?
(View responses)
 
  How useful were customized reports and tools for identifying high-growth occupations and the skills needed for those jobs in calendar year 2012?
(View responses)
 
  Which of the following are reasons that customized reports and tools were somewhat or not at all useful in identifying high-growth occupations and the skills needed for those jobs?
(check all that apply)
(View responses)
 
  What was the other reason(s)?
 
(View responses)
 
  Why did staff in your local area not use customized reports and tools?
(check all that apply)
(View responses)
 
  What was the other reason(s)?
 
(View responses)
 
  Why did staff not find customized reports and tools useful for identifying high-growth occupations and the skills needed for those jobs?
(check all that apply)
(View responses)
 
  What was the other reason(s)?
 
(View responses)
 
27.  To what extent did staff in your local area use other labor market data from the state labor market information office (for example, information about unemployment, wages, salaries, or skill sets) to identify high-growth occupations and the skills needed for those jobs in calendar year 2012?
(View responses)
 
  How useful were other labor market data for identifying high-growth occupations and the skills needed for those jobs in calendar year 2012?
(View responses)
 
  Which of the following are reasons that other labor market data were somewhat or not at all useful in identifying high-growth occupations and the skills needed for those jobs?
(check all that apply)
(View responses)
 
  What was the other reason(s)?
 
(View responses)
 
28.  What else do you think we should know about the sources of information your local area finds useful for identifying potential high-growth occupations and related skill requirements so that you can guide WIA Adult and Dislocated Worker participants toward training?
(View responses)
 

Part V: Comparison of local initiatives and other sources of information

29.  In order to guide WIA Adult and Dislocated Worker participants toward training, what source of information did staff in your local area primarily use to identify available jobs in calendar year 2012?
(View responses)
 
  Did you supplement these local initiatives with other sources of information (i.e., state job banks, online job postings, and job vacancy surveys)?
(View responses)
 
  Did you supplement these other sources of information with local initiatives (i.e., purchasing real-time labor market information, surveying employers, partnering with the economic development agency, etc.)?
(View responses)
 
  Why did you use local initiatives to identify available jobs?
(check all that apply)
(View responses)
 
  What was the other reason(s)?
 
(View responses)
 
  To what extent did the information from local initiatives align with other sources of information about available jobs (i.e., state job banks, online job postings, and job vacancy surveys)?
(View responses)
 
  Which source of information more accurately reflected the current needs of employers in your area?
(View responses)
 
30.  In order to guide WIA Adult and Dislocated Worker participants toward training, what source of information did staff in your local area primarily use to identify potential high-growth occupations in calendar year 2012?
(View responses)
 
  Did you supplement these local initiatives with information from the state labor market information office and the U.S. Department of Labor?
(View responses)
 
  Did you supplement information from the state labor market information office and the U.S. Department of Labor with local initiatives (i.e., purchasing real-time labor market information, surveying employers, partnering with the economic development agency, etc.)?
(View responses)
 
  Why did you use local initiatives to identify potential high-growth occupations?
(check all that apply)
(View responses)
 
  What was the other reason(s)?
 
(View responses)
 
  To what extent did the information from local initiatives align with information from the state labor market information office and the U.S. Department of Labor?
(View responses)
 
  Which source of information more accurately reflected the expected needs of employers in your area?
(View responses)
 
31.  What else do you think we should know about how the local initiatives you use to identify available jobs, potential high-growth occupations, and related skill requirements compare with other sources of labor market information?
(View responses)
 

Part VI: Approaches for guiding participants toward training

32.  In order to guide WIA Adult and Dislocated Worker participants toward training in calendar year 2012, did your WIB have a policy to either require or encourage participants to conduct any of the following activities?
(select one response per row)
(View responses)
   
Yes, it was required in the WIB policy
Yes, it was encouraged in the WIB policy
No, it was neither required nor encouraged in the WIB policy
Don't know
  Meet with case managers to discuss labor market information and training options
(View responses)
  Complete a skill assessment
(View responses)
  Complete an occupational interest inventory
(View responses)
  Demonstrate aptitude in an area
(View responses)
  Gather information about the occupation for which they want training
(View responses)
  Other
(View responses)
 
  What was the other approach(es)?
 
(View responses)
 
  Which one of these approaches do you believe is the most effective for helping WIA participants obtain employment?
(View responses)
 
33.  What else do you think we should know about the approaches your local area uses to guide WIA Adult and Dislocated Worker participants toward training?
(View responses)
 

Part VII: Challenges in guiding participants toward training

34.  How much of a challenge, if at all, were each of the following issues for your local area in guiding WIA Adult and Dislocated Worker participants toward training in calendar year 2012?
(select one response per row)
(View responses)
   
Major challenge
Moderate challenge
Minor challenge
Not a challenge
No opinion/ Don't know
  Challenges pertaining to training providers

Difficulty finding training providers who offered the right type of training
(View responses)
  Difficulty finding training providers who offered training at convenient times of the day for participants
(View responses)
  Difficulty finding training providers who offered training at convenient times of the year for participants (i.e. participants had to wait for the start of a new semester to enroll in training)
(View responses)
  Difficulty finding training providers who had enough slots for all of the participants who wanted training
(View responses)
  Difficulty finding training providers who could quickly adapt their curricula to the changing needs of employers
(View responses)
 
   
Major challenge
Moderate challenge
Minor challenge
Not a challenge
No opinion/ Don't know
  Challenges pertaining to costs

The cost of training in certain fields was above the ITA limit set by the state or local board
(View responses)
 
   
Major challenge
Moderate challenge
Minor challenge
Not a challenge
No opinion/ Don't know
  Challenges pertaining to participants

Participants lacked the basic skills necessary to participate in training
(View responses)
  Participants lived too far away from training providers to participate in training
(View responses)
  Participants lacked financial or work supports (e.g., child care or transportation) that would enable them to participate in training
(View responses)
  Participants were not interested in the jobs available or the training case managers tried to guide them toward
(View responses)
  Employers offered low wages that participants were not willing to accept
(View responses)
 
   
Major challenge
Moderate challenge
Minor challenge
Not a challenge
No opinion/ Don't know
  Data challenges

Industry/occupational projections of potential high-growth occupations from the state labor market information office did not reflect the expected needs of local employers
(View responses)
 
   
Major challenge
Moderate challenge
Minor challenge
Not a challenge
No opinion/ Don't know
  Other challenges
(View responses)
 
  What was the other challenge(s)?
 
(View responses)
 
35.  Did any of these challenges negatively affect your ability to guide WIA Adult and Dislocated Worker participants toward training?
(View responses)
 
  How did this challenge (or challenges) negatively affect your ability to guide WIA participants toward training?
(check all that apply)
(View responses)
 
  As a result of guiding fewer participants toward training, did fewer participants gain employment?
(View responses)
 
  Were there some challenges that contributed most to this result?
(View responses)
 
  What challenge(s) contributed the most?
(check all that apply)
Challenges pertaining to training providers
Challenges pertaining to costs
Challenges pertaining to participants
Challenges pertaining to data
Other challenges
(View responses)
 
  What were the other challenges?
 
(View responses)
 
36.  What else do you think we should know about the challenges your local area faces in guiding WIA Adult and Dislocated Worker participants toward training?
(View responses)
 

Part VIII: Local economic conditions

 
Please indicate whether your local workforce area experienced any of these conditions in calendar year 2012.
(View responses)
 
37.  Did employers in your local area have difficulty filling jobs in certain occupations in calendar year 2012?
(View responses)
 
  Do you know what these occupations were?
(View responses)
 
  What is the reason that you don't know what these occupations were?
(check all that apply)
(View responses)
 
  What is the other reason?
 
(View responses)
 
  What were these occupations and does your WIB consider them to be high-growth in your local area? You may list up to five occupations. If jobs in more than five occupations were difficult to fill, please list the five that were, to the best of your knowledge, the most difficult to fill.
(View responses)
 
What were these occupations?
Does your WIB consider this occupation to be high-growth in your local area?
   
(View responses)
 
(View responses)
   
(View responses)
 
(View responses)
   
(View responses)
 
(View responses)
   
(View responses)
 
(View responses)
   
(View responses)
 
(View responses)
 
  Did employers try to fill these jobs using American Job Centers in your local area?
(View responses)
 
  Which of the following were reasons that your local area had difficulty helping employers fill these jobs?
(select one response per row)
(View responses)
   
A reason
Not a reason
Don't know
  WIA participants lacked the relevant work experience, education, or training credentials needed for these jobs
(View responses)
  WIA participants did not have the basic skills to participate in the type of training that employers needed
(View responses)
  WIA participants were not interested in training for these occupations
(View responses)
  WIA participants were unwilling to accept the wages employers offered
(View responses)
  WIA participants were unwilling to accept the working conditions employers offered (e.g., hours, job security, promotion potential)
(View responses)
  We were unable to train enough workers to meet employers' needs
(View responses)
  We had difficulty finding training providers who offered the type of training that employers needed
(View responses)
  Employers were unable or unwilling to provide on-the-job training for participants who did not have the credentials they needed
(View responses)
  Other
(View responses)
 
  What was the other reason(s)?
 
(View responses)
 
  Why did employers not try to fill these jobs using American Job Centers in your local area?
(check all that apply)
(View responses)
 
  What was the other reason(s)?
 
(View responses)
 
38.  What else do you think we should know about the economic conditions in your local area and any related challenges?
(View responses)
 
  39. Are employment prospects greater outside your state than inside your state?
(View responses)
 
  To what extent do case managers in American Job Centers guide WIA Adult and Dislocated Worker participants toward training for jobs outside of the state?
(View responses)
 
  39. Are employment prospects greater outside your local workforce investment area than inside your local area?
(View responses)
 
  Where are these employment prospects located?
(check all that apply)
(View responses)
 
  To what extent do case managers in American Job Centers guide WIA Adult and Dislocated Worker participants toward training for jobs in neighboring areas in the state?
(View responses)
 
  To what extent do case managers in American Job Centers guide WIA Adult and Dislocated Worker participants toward training for jobs in non-neighboring areas in the state?
(View responses)
 
  To what extent do case managers in American Job Centers guide WIA Adult and Dislocated Worker participants toward training for jobs outside of the state?
(View responses)
 
40.  What else do you think we should know about employment prospects outside your local area and training for these jobs?
(View responses)
 

Part IX: Contact information

41.  What is the name, title, phone number and email address for the person who primarily completed this questionnaire? We might contact this person if we have follow-up questions.
(View responses)
  Name:
(View responses)
 
  Title:
(View responses)
 
  Phone:
(View responses)
 
  E-mail:
(View responses)
 
 

Submit your responses to GAO

42.  This completes our survey. Are you ready to submit your final completed survey to GAO?

(View responses)
 
43.  Would you like a record of your answers to this questionnaire? If so, click here to view and print a summary of your responses.

Click on the Exit and save button below to exit the survey.

Thank you for completing this questionnaire!
(View responses)




Please wait, file upload in progress.