Data Center Consolidation:

Agencies Need to Complete Inventories and Plans to Achieve Expected Savings

GAO-11-565: Published: Jul 19, 2011. Publicly Released: Jul 26, 2011.

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Over time, the federal government's demand for information technology has led to a dramatic rise in the number of federal data centers and an increase in operational costs. Recognizing this increase, the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) has launched a governmentwide initiative to consolidate data centers. GAO was asked to (1) assess whether agency consolidation documents include adequate detail for agencies to consolidate their centers, (2) identify the key consolidation challenges reported by agencies, and (3) evaluate whether lessons learned during state government consolidation efforts could be leveraged at the federal level. To address these objectives, GAO assessed the completeness of agency inventories and plans, interviewed agencies about their challenges, and evaluated the applicability of states' consolidation lessons to federal challenges.

In launching its federal data center consolidation initiative, OMB required the 24 participating agencies to submit data center inventories and consolidation plans by the end of August 2010, and provided guidance on key elements to include in the inventories and plans--such as hardware and software assets, goals, schedules, and cost-benefit calculations. The plans indicate that agencies anticipate closing about 650 data centers by fiscal year 2015 and saving about $700 million in doing so. However, only one of the agencies submitted a complete inventory and no agency submitted complete plans. Further, OMB did not require agencies to document the steps they took, if any, to verify the inventory data. For example, in their inventories, 14 agencies do not provide a complete listing of data centers and 15 do not list all of their software assets. Also, in their consolidation plans, 20 agencies do not reference a master schedule, 12 agencies do not address cost-benefit calculations, and 9 do not address risk management. The reason for these gaps, according to several agency officials, was that they had difficulty completing their inventories and plans within OMB's timelines. Until these inventories and plans are complete, agencies may not be able to implement their consolidation activities and realize expected cost savings. Moreover, without an understanding of the validity of agencies' consolidation data, OMB cannot be assured that agencies are providing a sound baseline for estimating consolidation savings and measuring progress against those goals. Agencies identified multiple challenges during data center consolidation, including those that are specific to OMB's consolidation initiative as well as those that are cultural, funding-related, operational, and technical in nature. For example, in attempting to fulfill OMB's requirements, 19 agencies reported difficulty in obtaining power usage data. In addition, 9 agencies reported challenges in maintaining services during the transition to consolidated services. Moving forward, it will be important for agencies to focus on mitigating such challenges as they implement their consolidation plans. Many state governments have undertaken data center consolidation initiatives in recent years and have encountered challenges similar to those reported by federal agencies. Specifically, 19 states reported lessons learned that could be leveraged at the federal level. For example, a West Virginia official reported that since the state had no funding for data center consolidation, it used the natural aging cycle of hardware to force consolidation; that is, when a piece of hardware was ready to be replaced, the new applications and software were put onto a consolidated server. Also, officials from North Carolina reported that organizations are typically concerned that by consolidating data centers, they will lose control of their data, service levels will decline, or costs will rise. The state learned that during the process of consolidation, the organizations' concerns should be documented, validated, and addressed. GAO is recommending that the Federal Chief Information Officer, department secretaries, and agency heads take steps to ensure that agency data center inventories and consolidation plans are complete. Most agencies agreed with GAO's recommendations. Defense and SSA did not agree to complete all missing elements of their inventories and plans. Based on OMB guidance on the importance of these elements, GAO maintains these recommendations to be reasonable and appropriate.

Status Legend:

More Info
  • Review Pending-GAO has not yet assessed implementation status.
  • Open-Actions to satisfy the intent of the recommendation have not been taken or are being planned, or actions that partially satisfy the intent of the recommendation have been taken.
  • Closed-implemented-Actions that satisfy the intent of the recommendation have been taken.
  • Closed-not implemented-While the intent of the recommendation has not been satisfied, time or circumstances have rendered the recommendation invalid.
    • Review Pending
    • Open
    • Closed - implemented
    • Closed - not implemented

    Recommendations for Executive Action

    Recommendation: The secretaries and agency heads of the Departments of Agriculture, Commerce, Defense, Education, Energy, Health and Human Services, Homeland Security, Interior, Justice, Labor, State, Transportation, Treasury, and Veterans Affairs; the Environmental Protection Agency, the General Services Administration, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration, the National Science Foundation, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission, the Office of Personnel Management, the Small Business Administration, the Social Security Administration, and the U.S. Agency for International Development should direct their component agencies and their data center consolidation program managers to complete the missing elements in their respective data center consolidation inventories and plans.

    Agency Affected: Department of Health and Human Services

    Status: Open

    Comments: The Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) submitted an updated consolidation plan in September 2011. However, while the plan provided complete information on the department's quantitative goals, qualitative impacts, consolidation approach, and consolidation scope, it provided only partial information on a cost-benefit analysis and unexpected consolidation costs. Subsequently, in March 2013, the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) issued a memorandum that made significant changes to the Federal Data Center Consolidation Initiative's reporting requirements, including eliminating the requirement for agencies (including HHS) to submit the previously required data center consolidation plans. Rather, starting in May 2013, agencies were to begin submitting data center consolidation information to OMB via three primary means--an information resources management strategic plan, an enterprise road map, and an integrated data collection channel. After agencies fully implement OMB's new reporting requirements, which is expected in February 2014, we will review the extent to which the information submitted by HHS includes elements required by the reporting structure. Regarding HHS's data center inventory, as of June 2013, the department's updated inventory provided complete information on physical servers, virtualization, and network storage, but provided incomplete information on other key elements, such as power capacity, energy usage, and facility staffing. We will continue to evaluate HHS's progress in implementing this recommendation.

    Recommendation: The secretaries and agency heads of the Departments of Agriculture, Commerce, Defense, Education, Energy, Health and Human Services, Homeland Security, Interior, Justice, Labor, State, Transportation, Treasury, and Veterans Affairs; the Environmental Protection Agency, the General Services Administration, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration, the National Science Foundation, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission, the Office of Personnel Management, the Small Business Administration, the Social Security Administration, and the U.S. Agency for International Development should direct their component agencies and their data center consolidation program managers to complete the missing elements in their respective data center consolidation inventories and plans.

    Agency Affected: United States Agency for International Development

    Status: Open

    Comments: The U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID) submitted an updated consolidation plan in September 2011. However, while the agency's consolidation plan provided complete information on consolidation approach, consolidation scope, consolidation timeline, performance metrics, and risk management, it provided only partial information on utilization goals, a cost-benefit analysis, and consolidation progress, and did not provide a master program schedule. Subsequently, in March 2013, the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) issued a memorandum that made significant changes to the Federal Data Center Consolidation Initiative's reporting requirements, including eliminating the requirement for agencies (including USAID) to submit the previously required data center consolidation plans. Rather, starting in May 2013, agencies were to begin submitting data center consolidation information to OMB via three primary means--an information resources management strategic plan, an enterprise road map, and an integrated data collection channel. After agencies fully implement OMB's new reporting requirements, which is expected in February 2014, we will review the extent to which the information submitted by USAID includes elements required by the reporting structure. Regarding USAID's data center inventory, as of June 2013, the department's updated inventory provided complete information on physical servers, virtualization, and network storage, but only partial information on other key elements such as data center power capacity, electricity usage, and facility staffing. We will continue to evaluate USAID's progress in implementing this recommendation.

    Recommendation: The secretaries and agency heads of the Departments of Agriculture, Commerce, Defense, Education, Energy, Health and Human Services, Homeland Security, Interior, Justice, Labor, State, Transportation, Treasury, and Veterans Affairs; the Environmental Protection Agency, the General Services Administration, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration, the National Science Foundation, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission, the Office of Personnel Management, the Small Business Administration, the Social Security Administration, and the U.S. Agency for International Development should direct their component agencies and their data center consolidation program managers to complete the missing elements in their respective data center consolidation inventories and plans.

    Agency Affected: Social Security Administration

    Status: Open

    Comments: The Social Security Administration (SSA) submitted an updated data center inventory in June 2011 and an updated consolidation plan in October 2011. However, while the inventory is now complete, the plan was still missing key information. Specifically, while the plan contained complete information on consolidation approach, consolidation scope, consolidation timeline, performance metrics, and risk management, it only contained partial information utilization goals, consolidation progress, and cost savings, and did not contain information on a master program schedule or cost-benefit analysis. An agency official stated that the agency would include more complete utilization goals in SSA's next plan update. Another official noted that SSA was working on a more detailed schedule and was beginning to work with the Office of Management and Budget's (OMB) total cost of ownership model to develop cost and savings estimates. Subsequently, in March 2013, OMB issued a memorandum that made significant changes to the Federal Data Center Consolidation Initiative's reporting requirements, including eliminating the requirement for agencies (including SSA) to submit the previously required data center consolidation plans. Rather, starting in May 2013, agencies were to begin submitting data center consolidation information to OMB via three primary means--an information resources management strategic plan, an enterprise road map, and an integrated data collection channel. After agencies fully implement OMB's new reporting requirements, which is expected in February 2014, we will review the extent to which the information submitted by SSA includes elements required by the reporting structure.

    Recommendation: The secretaries and agency heads of the Departments of Agriculture, Commerce, Defense, Education, Energy, Health and Human Services, Homeland Security, Interior, Justice, Labor, State, Transportation, Treasury, and Veterans Affairs; the Environmental Protection Agency, the General Services Administration, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration, the National Science Foundation, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission, the Office of Personnel Management, the Small Business Administration, the Social Security Administration, and the U.S. Agency for International Development should direct their component agencies and their data center consolidation program managers to complete the missing elements in their respective data center consolidation inventories and plans.

    Agency Affected: General Services Administration

    Status: Open

    Comments: The General Services Administration (GSA) submitted an updated consolidation plan in September 2011. However, while the agency's consolidation plan provided complete information on goals, consolidation approach, consolidation scope, performance metrics, and risk management, it provided only partial information on utilization goals and consolidation savings and unexpected costs. Subsequently, in March 2013, the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) issued a memorandum that made significant changes to the Federal Data Center Consolidation Initiative's reporting requirements, including eliminating the requirement for agencies (including GSA) to submit the previously required data center consolidation plans. Rather, starting in May 2013, agencies were to begin submitting data center consolidation information to OMB via three primary means--an information resources management strategic plan, an enterprise road map, and an integrated data collection channel. After agencies fully implement OMB's new reporting requirements, which is expected in February 2014, we will review the extent to which the information submitted by GSA includes elements required by the reporting structure. Regarding GSA's data center inventory, as of June 2013, the agency's updated inventory provided complete information on physical servers, virtualization, and network storage, but only partial information on other key elements such as data center power capacity, electricity usage, and facility staffing. We will continue to evaluate GSA's progress in implementing this recommendation.

    Recommendation: The secretaries and agency heads of the Departments of Agriculture, Commerce, Defense, Education, Energy, Health and Human Services, Homeland Security, Interior, Justice, Labor, State, Transportation, Treasury, and Veterans Affairs; the Environmental Protection Agency, the General Services Administration, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration, the National Science Foundation, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission, the Office of Personnel Management, the Small Business Administration, the Social Security Administration, and the U.S. Agency for International Development should direct their component agencies and their data center consolidation program managers to complete the missing elements in their respective data center consolidation inventories and plans.

    Agency Affected: Department of Commerce

    Status: Open

    Comments: The Department of Commerce submitted an updated consolidation plan in September 2011. While the department's consolidation plan is complete, its inventory is missing key information. Specifically, as of June 2013, the department's updated inventory provided complete information on physical servers, virtualization, and network storage, but provided incomplete information on other key elements, such as power capacity, electrical usage, and facility staffing and related costs. We will continue to evaluate Commerce's progress in implementing this recommendation.

    Recommendation: The secretaries and agency heads of the Departments of Agriculture, Commerce, Defense, Education, Energy, Health and Human Services, Homeland Security, Interior, Justice, Labor, State, Transportation, Treasury, and Veterans Affairs; the Environmental Protection Agency, the General Services Administration, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration, the National Science Foundation, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission, the Office of Personnel Management, the Small Business Administration, the Social Security Administration, and the U.S. Agency for International Development should require their data center consolidation program managers to consider consolidation challenges and lessons learned when updating their consolidation plans.

    Agency Affected: Department of Homeland Security

    Status: Closed - Implemented

    Comments: The Department of Homeland Security (DH) submitted an updated consolidation plan in September 2011 and this plan discusses consolidation challenges and lessons learned. For example, the plan discusses the challenges in obtaining planned congressional funding and the immense amount of stakeholder coordination involved in consolidation. Further, the plan discusses how DH has built the collection of lessons learned into the fifth and final closeout stage of the department's documented consolidation approach.

    Recommendation: The secretaries and agency heads of the Departments of Agriculture, Commerce, Defense, Education, Energy, Health and Human Services, Homeland Security, Interior, Justice, Labor, State, Transportation, Treasury, and Veterans Affairs; the Environmental Protection Agency, the General Services Administration, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration, the National Science Foundation, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission, the Office of Personnel Management, the Small Business Administration, the Social Security Administration, and the U.S. Agency for International Development should require their data center consolidation program managers to consider consolidation challenges and lessons learned when updating their consolidation plans.

    Agency Affected: Environmental Protection Agency

    Status: Closed - Implemented

    Comments: The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) submitted an updated consolidation plan in September 2011, and the plan discusses both consolidation challenges and lessons learned. Specifically, the plan discusses consolidation delays due to technology and resource constraints and how EPA consulted a range of IT consolidation practitioners and experts from government and industry to identify proven practices and lessons learned.

    Recommendation: The secretaries and agency heads of the Departments of Agriculture, Commerce, Defense, Education, Energy, Health and Human Services, Homeland Security, Interior, Justice, Labor, State, Transportation, Treasury, and Veterans Affairs; the Environmental Protection Agency, the General Services Administration, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration, the National Science Foundation, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission, the Office of Personnel Management, the Small Business Administration, the Social Security Administration, and the U.S. Agency for International Development should require their data center consolidation program managers to consider consolidation challenges and lessons learned when updating their consolidation plans.

    Agency Affected: Department of Veterans Affairs

    Status: Closed - Implemented

    Comments: The Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) submitted an updated consolidation plan in September 2011, and the plan discusses both consolidation challenges and lessons learned. Specifically, the plan discusses changes in consolidation strategy mandated at the executive level and delays in the procurements required for consolidations. The plan also discusses the department's review of commercial and public best practices in developing VA's 2011 consolidation plan.

    Recommendation: The secretaries and agency heads of the Departments of Agriculture, Commerce, Defense, Education, Energy, Health and Human Services, Homeland Security, Interior, Justice, Labor, State, Transportation, Treasury, and Veterans Affairs; the Environmental Protection Agency, the General Services Administration, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration, the National Science Foundation, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission, the Office of Personnel Management, the Small Business Administration, the Social Security Administration, and the U.S. Agency for International Development should require their data center consolidation program managers to consider consolidation challenges and lessons learned when updating their consolidation plans.

    Agency Affected: Department of Education

    Status: Open

    Comments: The Department of Education (Education) submitted an updated consolidation plan in September 2011 and while the plan noted that consolidation challenges and lessons learned would continue to be considered, it did not provide specific examples of either. Subsequently, in March 2013, the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) issued a memorandum that made significant changes to the Federal Data Center Consolidation Initiative's reporting requirements, including eliminating the requirement for agencies (including Education) to submit the previously required data center consolidation plans. Rather, starting in May 2013, agencies were to begin submitting data center consolidation information to OMB via three primary means--an information resources management strategic plan, an enterprise road map, and an integrated data collection channel. After agencies fully implement OMB's new reporting requirements, which is expected in February 2014, we will review the extent to which the information submitted by Education considers data center consolidation challenges and lessons learned.

    Recommendation: The secretaries and agency heads of the Departments of Agriculture, Commerce, Defense, Education, Energy, Health and Human Services, Homeland Security, Interior, Justice, Labor, State, Transportation, Treasury, and Veterans Affairs; the Environmental Protection Agency, the General Services Administration, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration, the National Science Foundation, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission, the Office of Personnel Management, the Small Business Administration, the Social Security Administration, and the U.S. Agency for International Development should require their data center consolidation program managers to consider consolidation challenges and lessons learned when updating their consolidation plans.

    Agency Affected: Small Business Administration

    Status: Open

    Comments: The Small Business Administration (SBA) submitted an updated consolidation plan in September 2011. However, while the plan discussed lessons learned, including that SBA planned to handle simpler, lower risk items first, proving success and competency and documenting and applying lessons learned along the way, it did not discuss consolidation challenges. An agency official stated that SBA was still working to identify the agency's consolidation challenges. Subsequently, in March 2013, the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) issued a memorandum that made significant changes to the Federal Data Center Consolidation Initiative's reporting requirements, including eliminating the requirement for agencies (including SBA) to submit the previously required data center consolidation plans. Rather, starting in May 2013, agencies were to begin submitting data center consolidation information to OMB via three primary means--an information resources management strategic plan, an enterprise road map, and an integrated data collection channel. After agencies fully implement OMB's new reporting requirements, which is expected in February 2014, we will review the extent to which the information submitted by SBA includes information about consolidation challenges.

    Recommendation: The secretaries and agency heads of the Departments of Agriculture, Commerce, Defense, Education, Energy, Health and Human Services, Homeland Security, Interior, Justice, Labor, State, Transportation, Treasury, and Veterans Affairs; the Environmental Protection Agency, the General Services Administration, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration, the National Science Foundation, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission, the Office of Personnel Management, the Small Business Administration, the Social Security Administration, and the U.S. Agency for International Development should direct their component agencies and their data center consolidation program managers to complete the missing elements in their respective data center consolidation inventories and plans.

    Agency Affected: Office of Personnel Management

    Status: Open

    Comments: The Office of Personnel Management (OPM) submitted an updated consolidation plan in September 2011. However, while the plan provided complete information on goals, consolidation approach, consolidation scope, consolidation timeline, and performance metrics, it provided only partial information on a cost-benefit analysis and did not provide information on a master program schedule, risk management, or a communications plan. Subsequently, in March 2013, the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) issued a memorandum that made significant changes to the Federal Data Center Consolidation Initiative's reporting requirements, including eliminating the requirement for agencies (including OPM) to submit the previously required data center consolidation plans. Rather, starting in May 2013, agencies were to begin submitting data center consolidation information to OMB via three primary means--an information resources management strategic plan, an enterprise road map, and an integrated data collection channel. After agencies fully implement OMB's new reporting requirements, which is expected in February 2014, we will review the extent to which the information submitted by OPM includes elements required by the reporting structure. Regarding OPM's data center inventory, as of June 2013, the agency's updated inventory provided complete information on physical servers, power capacity, energy usage, and network storage, but provided incomplete information on facility staffing and related costs. We will continue to evaluate OPM's progress in implementing this recommendation.

    Recommendation: The secretaries and agency heads of the Departments of Agriculture, Commerce, Defense, Education, Energy, Health and Human Services, Homeland Security, Interior, Justice, Labor, State, Transportation, Treasury, and Veterans Affairs; the Environmental Protection Agency, the General Services Administration, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration, the National Science Foundation, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission, the Office of Personnel Management, the Small Business Administration, the Social Security Administration, and the U.S. Agency for International Development should direct their component agencies and their data center consolidation program managers to complete the missing elements in their respective data center consolidation inventories and plans.

    Agency Affected: Department of the Interior

    Status: Open

    Comments: The Department of the Interior (Interior) submitted an updated consolidation plan in September 2011. However, while the plan provided complete information on the department's qualitative impacts, consolidation approach, and consolidation scope, and master program schedule, it provided only partial information on quantitative goals, a cost-benefit analysis, and risk management. Subsequently, in March 2013, the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) issued a memorandum that made significant changes to the Federal Data Center Consolidation Initiative's reporting requirements, including eliminating the requirement for agencies (including Interior) to submit the previously required data center consolidation plans. Rather, starting in May 2013, agencies were to begin submitting data center consolidation information to OMB via three primary means--an information resources management strategic plan, an enterprise road map, and an integrated data collection channel. After agencies fully implement OMB's new reporting requirements, which is expected in February 2014, we will review the extent to which the information submitted by Interior includes elements required by the reporting structure. Regarding Interior's data center inventory, as of June 2013, the department's updated inventory provided complete information on physical servers, virtualization, and network storage, but provided incomplete information on other key elements, such as power capacity and facility staffing. We will continue to evaluate Interior's progress in implementing this recommendation.

    Recommendation: The secretaries and agency heads of the Departments of Agriculture, Commerce, Defense, Education, Energy, Health and Human Services, Homeland Security, Interior, Justice, Labor, State, Transportation, Treasury, and Veterans Affairs; the Environmental Protection Agency, the General Services Administration, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration, the National Science Foundation, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission, the Office of Personnel Management, the Small Business Administration, the Social Security Administration, and the U.S. Agency for International Development should direct their component agencies and their data center consolidation program managers to complete the missing elements in their respective data center consolidation inventories and plans.

    Agency Affected: Department of the Treasury

    Status: Open

    Comments: The Department of Treasury (Treasury) submitted an updated consolidation plan in September 2011. However, while the department's consolidation plan provided complete information on consolidation approach, consolidation scope, consolidation timeline, and performance metrics, it did not provide a master program schedule or cost-benefit analysis. Subsequently, in March 2013, the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) issued a memorandum that made significant changes to the Federal Data Center Consolidation Initiative's reporting requirements, including eliminating the requirement for agencies (including Treasury) to submit the previously required data center consolidation plans. Rather, starting in May 2013, agencies were to begin submitting data center consolidation information to OMB via three primary means--an information resources management strategic plan, an enterprise road map, and an integrated data collection channel. After agencies fully implement OMB's new reporting requirements, which is expected in February 2014, we will review the extent to which the information submitted by Treasury includes elements required by the reporting structure. Regarding Treasury's data center inventory, as of June 2013, the department's updated inventory provided complete information on physical servers and virtualization, but only partial information on other key elements such as power capacity and usage, network storage, and facility staffing. We will continue to evaluate Treasury's progress in implementing this recommendation.

    Recommendation: To better ensure that the federal data center consolidation initiative improves governmental efficiency and achieves cost savings, the Director of the Office of Management and Budget should direct the Federal Chief Information Officer to require that agencies, when updating their data center inventories in the third quarter of each fiscal year, state what actions have been taken to verify the inventories and to identify any limitations of this information.

    Agency Affected: Executive Office of the President: Office of Management and Budget

    Status: Closed - Implemented

    Comments: In July 2011, OMB issued guidance to the 24 Federal Data Center Consolidation Initiative agencies requiring them to submit complete consolidation plans by the end of September 2011, and to also provide a signed verification letter from their CIO which attests to the completeness of agency and subordinate organization consolidation plans, actions agencies took to verify their asset inventories, and any limitations of inventory and consolidation plan information. In March 2012, OMB further expanded on this guidance by requiring that all agencies, by the end of the fourth quarter of every fiscal year, submit an updated consolidation plan along with a signed verification letter similar to what was required in 2011.

    Recommendation: To better ensure that the federal data center consolidation initiative improves governmental efficiency and achieves cost savings, the Director of the Office of Management and Budget should direct the Federal Chief Information Officer to require that agencies complete the missing elements in their respective plans and submit complete data center consolidation plans, or provide a schedule for when they will do so, by September 30, 2011.

    Agency Affected: Executive Office of the President: Office of Management and Budget

    Status: Closed - Implemented

    Comments: In July 2011, OMB issued guidance to the 24 Federal Data Center Consolidation Initiative agencies requiring them to submit complete consolidation plans by the end of September 2011. In March 2012, OMB further expanded on this guidance by requiring that all agencies, by the end of the fourth quarter of every fiscal year, complete all elements missing from their consolidation plans and to submit an updated consolidation plan.

    Recommendation: To better ensure that the federal data center consolidation initiative improves governmental efficiency and achieves cost savings, the Director of the Office of Management and Budget should direct the Federal Chief Information Officer to require agencies to consider consolidation challenges and lessons learned when updating their plans.

    Agency Affected: Executive Office of the President: Office of Management and Budget

    Status: Closed - Implemented

    Comments: In July 2011, OMB issued guidance to the 24 Federal Data Center Consolidation Initiative agencies requiring them to submit complete consolidation plans by the end of September 2011, which were to reflect consolidation challenges experienced to date and to integrate lessons learned.

    Recommendation: To better ensure that the federal data center consolidation initiative improves governmental efficiency and achieves cost savings, the Director of the Office of Management and Budget should direct the Federal Chief Information Officer to utilize the existing accountability infrastructure by requiring the Data Center Consolidation Task Force to assess agency consolidation plans to ensure they are complete and to monitor the agencies' implementation of their plans.

    Agency Affected: Executive Office of the President: Office of Management and Budget

    Status: Open

    Comments: In 2011, to help improve completeness of agency's consolidation plans, the Chief Information Officer Council's Data Center Consolidation Task Force established a peer review program. As part of this effort, agencies were partnered with agencies of similar size and complexity to exchange consolidation plans. Each partner was to review the other's plan and provide feedback on compliance, completeness, and clarity. However, we reported in June 2012 that only 1 of the 24 agency consolidation plans was complete. Subsequently, in March 2013, the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) issued a memorandum that made significant changes to the Federal Data Center Consolidation Initiative's reporting requirements, including eliminating the requirement for agencies to submit the previously required data center consolidation plans. Rather, starting in May 2013, agencies were to begin submitting data center consolidation information to OMB via three primary means--an information resources management strategic plan, an enterprise road map, and an integrated data collection channel. After agencies fully implement OMB's new reporting requirements, which is expected in February 2014, we will review the extent to which the Data Center Consolidation Task Force has assessed agencies' data center consolidation information to ensure that it is complete and monitored agencies' implementation of their consolidation efforts.

    Recommendation: The secretaries and agency heads of the Departments of Agriculture, Commerce, Defense, Education, Energy, Health and Human Services, Homeland Security, Interior, Justice, Labor, State, Transportation, Treasury, and Veterans Affairs; the Environmental Protection Agency, the General Services Administration, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration, the National Science Foundation, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission, the Office of Personnel Management, the Small Business Administration, the Social Security Administration, and the U.S. Agency for International Development should direct their component agencies and their data center consolidation program managers to complete the missing elements in their respective data center consolidation inventories and plans.

    Agency Affected: Department of Education

    Status: Open

    Comments: The Department of Education (Education) submitted an updated consolidation plan in September 2011. However, while the plan provided complete information on the department's quantitative goals, qualitative impacts, consolidation approach, and consolidation scope, it provided only partial information on the department's performance metrics and did not discuss consolidation challenges or successes. Subsequently, in March 2013, the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) issued a memorandum that made significant changes to the Federal Data Center Consolidation Initiative's reporting requirements, including eliminating the requirement for agencies (including Education) to submit the previously required data center consolidation plans. Rather, starting in May 2013, agencies were to begin submitting data center consolidation information to OMB via three primary means--an information resources management strategic plan, an enterprise road map, and an integrated data collection channel. After agencies fully implement OMB's new reporting requirements, which is expected in February 2014, we will review the extent to which the information submitted by Education includes elements required by the reporting structure. Regarding Education's data center inventory, as of June 2013, the department's updated inventory provided complete information on virtualization and network storage, but provided incomplete information on other key elements, such as physical servers, power capacity, energy usage, and facility staffing. We will continue to evaluate Education's progress in implementing this recommendation.

    Recommendation: The secretaries and agency heads of the Departments of Agriculture, Commerce, Defense, Education, Energy, Health and Human Services, Homeland Security, Interior, Justice, Labor, State, Transportation, Treasury, and Veterans Affairs; the Environmental Protection Agency, the General Services Administration, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration, the National Science Foundation, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission, the Office of Personnel Management, the Small Business Administration, the Social Security Administration, and the U.S. Agency for International Development should direct their component agencies and their data center consolidation program managers to complete the missing elements in their respective data center consolidation inventories and plans.

    Agency Affected: Department of Agriculture

    Status: Open

    Comments: The Department of Agriculture (Agriculture) submitted an updated data updated consolidation plan in September 2011. However, while the plan provided complete information on the department's consolidation approach and scope, performance metrics, a master program schedule, and risk management, it did not discuss consolidation challenges or unexpected consolidation costs. Subsequently, in March 2013, the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) issued a memorandum that made significant changes to the Federal Data Center Consolidation Initiative's reporting requirements, including eliminating the requirement for agencies (including Agriculture) to submit the previously required data center consolidation plans. Rather, starting in May 2013, agencies were to begin submitting data center consolidation information to OMB via three primary means--an information resources management strategic plan, an enterprise road map, and an integrated data collection channel. After agencies fully implement OMB's new reporting requirements, which is expected in February 2014, we will review the extent to which the information submitted by Agriculture includes elements required by the reporting structure. Regarding Agriculture's data center inventory, as of June 2013, the department's updated inventory had addressed previously missing elements, including information related to IT servers, electricity usage, and network storage.

    Recommendation: The secretaries and agency heads of the Departments of Agriculture, Commerce, Defense, Education, Energy, Health and Human Services, Homeland Security, Interior, Justice, Labor, State, Transportation, Treasury, and Veterans Affairs; the Environmental Protection Agency, the General Services Administration, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration, the National Science Foundation, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission, the Office of Personnel Management, the Small Business Administration, the Social Security Administration, and the U.S. Agency for International Development should direct their component agencies and their data center consolidation program managers to complete the missing elements in their respective data center consolidation inventories and plans.

    Agency Affected: National Science Foundation

    Status: Open

    Comments: The National Science Foundation (NSF) submitted an updated data center inventory in June 2011 and an updated consolidation plan in September 2011. However, while the inventory is now complete, the plan was still missing key information. Specifically, while the plan contained complete information on goals, consolidation approach, consolidation scope, performance metrics, and risk management, it provided only partial information on consolidation successes and challenges, and did not provide information on a master program schedule or cost savings. An agency official stated that future NSF plans could be expected to discuss successes and challenges in greater detail. A second official stated that NSF expects to have savings information to report in future versions of the consolidation plan. Subsequently, in March 2013, the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) issued a memorandum that made significant changes to the Federal Data Center Consolidation Initiative's reporting requirements, including eliminating the requirement for agencies (including NSF) to submit the previously required data center consolidation plans. Rather, starting in May 2013, agencies were to begin submitting data center consolidation information to OMB via three primary means--an information resources management strategic plan, an enterprise road map, and an integrated data collection channel. After agencies fully implement OMB's new reporting requirements, which is expected in February 2014, we will review the extent to which the information submitted by NSF includes elements required by the reporting structure.

    Recommendation: The secretaries and agency heads of the Departments of Agriculture, Commerce, Defense, Education, Energy, Health and Human Services, Homeland Security, Interior, Justice, Labor, State, Transportation, Treasury, and Veterans Affairs; the Environmental Protection Agency, the General Services Administration, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration, the National Science Foundation, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission, the Office of Personnel Management, the Small Business Administration, the Social Security Administration, and the U.S. Agency for International Development should direct their component agencies and their data center consolidation program managers to complete the missing elements in their respective data center consolidation inventories and plans.

    Agency Affected: Department of Energy

    Status: Open

    Comments: The Department of Energy (Energy) submitted an updated consolidation plan in September 2011. However, while the plan provided complete information on the department's qualitative impacts, consolidation approach, and consolidation scope, and performance metrics, it provided only partial information on the department's quantitative goals and cost savings, and did not provide information on a master program schedule or cost-benefit analysis. Subsequently, in March 2013, the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) issued a memorandum that made significant changes to the Federal Data Center Consolidation Initiative's reporting requirements, including eliminating the requirement for agencies (including Energy) to submit the previously required data center consolidation plans. Rather, starting in May 2013, agencies were to begin submitting data center consolidation information to OMB via three primary means--an information resources management strategic plan, an enterprise road map, and an integrated data collection channel. After agencies fully implement OMB's new reporting requirements, which is expected in February 2014, we will review the extent to which the information submitted by Energy includes elements required by the reporting structure. Regarding Energy's data center inventory, as of June 2013, the department's updated inventory provided complete information on physical servers, virtualization, and network storage, but provided incomplete information on other key elements, such as power capacity, energy usage, and facility staffing and related costs. We will continue to evaluate Energy's progress in implementing this recommendation.

    Recommendation: The secretaries and agency heads of the Departments of Agriculture, Commerce, Defense, Education, Energy, Health and Human Services, Homeland Security, Interior, Justice, Labor, State, Transportation, Treasury, and Veterans Affairs; the Environmental Protection Agency, the General Services Administration, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration, the National Science Foundation, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission, the Office of Personnel Management, the Small Business Administration, the Social Security Administration, and the U.S. Agency for International Development should direct their component agencies and their data center consolidation program managers to complete the missing elements in their respective data center consolidation inventories and plans.

    Agency Affected: Department of Homeland Security

    Status: Open

    Comments: The Department of Homeland Security (DHS) submitted an updated consolidation plan in September 2011. However, while the plan provided complete information on the department's qualitative impacts, consolidation approach, and consolidation scope, master program schedule, and cost-benefit analysis, it provided only partial information on quantitative goals and cost savings, and did not provide any information on performance metrics. Subsequently, in March 2013, the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) issued a memorandum that made significant changes to the Federal Data Center Consolidation Initiative's reporting requirements, including eliminating the requirement for agencies (including DHS) to submit the previously required data center consolidation plans. Rather, starting in May 2013, agencies were to begin submitting data center consolidation information to OMB via three primary means--an information resources management strategic plan, an enterprise road map, and an integrated data collection channel. After agencies fully implement OMB's new reporting requirements, which is expected in February 2014, we will review the extent to which the information submitted by DHS includes elements required by the reporting structure. Regarding DHS's data center inventory, as of June 2013, the department's updated inventory provided complete information on physical servers, virtualization, and network storage, but provides incomplete information on other key elements, such as power capacity, energy usage, and facility staffing. We will continue to evaluate DHS's progress in implementing this recommendation.

    Recommendation: The secretaries and agency heads of the Departments of Agriculture, Commerce, Defense, Education, Energy, Health and Human Services, Homeland Security, Interior, Justice, Labor, State, Transportation, Treasury, and Veterans Affairs; the Environmental Protection Agency, the General Services Administration, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration, the National Science Foundation, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission, the Office of Personnel Management, the Small Business Administration, the Social Security Administration, and the U.S. Agency for International Development should direct their component agencies and their data center consolidation program managers to complete the missing elements in their respective data center consolidation inventories and plans.

    Agency Affected: Department of Justice

    Status: Open

    Comments: The Department of Justice (Justice) submitted an updated consolidation plan in September 2011. However, while the plan provided complete information on the department's consolidation scope and approach and provides a high-level consolidation time, it did not provide information on the department's savings and utilization goals and did not provide aggregate cost-benefit information on a year-by-year basis through 2015. Subsequently, in March 2013, the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) issued a memorandum that made significant changes to the Federal Data Center Consolidation Initiative's reporting requirements, including eliminating the requirement for agencies (including Justice) to submit the previously required data center consolidation plans. Rather, starting in May 2013, agencies were to begin submitting data center consolidation information to OMB via three primary means--an information resources management strategic plan, an enterprise road map, and an integrated data collection channel. After agencies fully implement OMB's new reporting requirements, which is expected in February 2014, we will review the extent to which the information submitted by Justice includes elements required by the reporting structure. Regarding Justice's data center inventory, as of June 2013, the department's updated inventory provided complete information on physical servers, virtualization, and network storage, but provided incomplete information on other key elements, such as power capacity, energy usage, and facility staffing. We will continue to evaluate Justice's progress in implementing this recommendation.

    Recommendation: The secretaries and agency heads of the Departments of Agriculture, Commerce, Defense, Education, Energy, Health and Human Services, Homeland Security, Interior, Justice, Labor, State, Transportation, Treasury, and Veterans Affairs; the Environmental Protection Agency, the General Services Administration, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration, the National Science Foundation, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission, the Office of Personnel Management, the Small Business Administration, the Social Security Administration, and the U.S. Agency for International Development should require their data center consolidation program managers to consider consolidation challenges and lessons learned when updating their consolidation plans.

    Agency Affected: Office of Personnel Management

    Status: Open

    Comments: The Office of Personnel Management (OPM) submitted an updated consolidation plan in September 2011. However, while the plan discussed challenges, such as balancing additional business requirements for technology with an overall strategy of reducing IT operational costs, meeting other strategic goals while reducing the agency's IT footprint, and funding for Green IT assessments, it did not discuss lessons learned. OPM stated that it plans to include this information in future plans. Subsequently, in March 2013, the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) issued a memorandum that made significant changes to the Federal Data Center Consolidation Initiative's reporting requirements, including eliminating the requirement for agencies (including OPM) to submit the previously required data center consolidation plans. Rather, starting in May 2013, agencies were to begin submitting data center consolidation information to OMB via three primary means--an information resources management strategic plan, an enterprise road map, and an integrated data collection channel. After agencies fully implement OMB's new reporting requirements, which is expected in February 2014, we will review the extent to which the information submitted by OPM considers data center consolidation lessons learned.

    Recommendation: The secretaries and agency heads of the Departments of Agriculture, Commerce, Defense, Education, Energy, Health and Human Services, Homeland Security, Interior, Justice, Labor, State, Transportation, Treasury, and Veterans Affairs; the Environmental Protection Agency, the General Services Administration, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration, the National Science Foundation, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission, the Office of Personnel Management, the Small Business Administration, the Social Security Administration, and the U.S. Agency for International Development should require their data center consolidation program managers to consider consolidation challenges and lessons learned when updating their consolidation plans.

    Agency Affected: National Aeronautics and Space Administration

    Status: Open

    Comments: The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) submitted an updated consolidation plan in September 2011, but the plan did not discuss consolidation challenges or lessons learned. An agency official acknowledged that this information was missing from the plan. Subsequently, in March 2013, the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) issued a memorandum that made significant changes to the Federal Data Center Consolidation Initiative's reporting requirements, including eliminating the requirement for agencies (including NASA) to submit the previously required data center consolidation plans. Rather, starting in May 2013, agencies were to begin submitting data center consolidation information to OMB via three primary means'an information resources management strategic plan, an enterprise road map, and an integrated data collection channel. After agencies fully implement OMB's new reporting requirements, which is expected in February 2014, we will review the extent to which the information submitted by NASA includes information about consolidation challenges and lessons learned.

    Recommendation: The secretaries and agency heads of the Departments of Agriculture, Commerce, Defense, Education, Energy, Health and Human Services, Homeland Security, Interior, Justice, Labor, State, Transportation, Treasury, and Veterans Affairs; the Environmental Protection Agency, the General Services Administration, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration, the National Science Foundation, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission, the Office of Personnel Management, the Small Business Administration, the Social Security Administration, and the U.S. Agency for International Development should require their data center consolidation program managers to consider consolidation challenges and lessons learned when updating their consolidation plans.

    Agency Affected: Department of the Treasury

    Status: Open

    Comments: The Department of the Treasury (Treasury) submitted an updated consolidation plan in September 2011, but the plan did not discuss consolidation challenges or lessons learned. An agency official acknowledged that this information was missing from the plan, but that the department was addressing it as part of Treasury's enterprise road map development effort. Subsequently, in March 2013, the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) issued a memorandum that made significant changes to the Federal Data Center Consolidation Initiative's reporting requirements, including eliminating the requirement for agencies (including Treasury) to submit the previously required data center consolidation plans. Rather, starting in May 2013, agencies were to begin submitting data center consolidation information to OMB via three primary means--an information resources management strategic plan, an enterprise road map, and an integrated data collection channel. After agencies fully implement OMB's new reporting requirements, which is expected in February 2014, we will review the extent to which the information submitted by Treasury includes information about consolidation challenges and lessons learned.

    Recommendation: The secretaries and agency heads of the Departments of Agriculture, Commerce, Defense, Education, Energy, Health and Human Services, Homeland Security, Interior, Justice, Labor, State, Transportation, Treasury, and Veterans Affairs; the Environmental Protection Agency, the General Services Administration, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration, the National Science Foundation, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission, the Office of Personnel Management, the Small Business Administration, the Social Security Administration, and the U.S. Agency for International Development should direct their component agencies and their data center consolidation program managers to complete the missing elements in their respective data center consolidation inventories and plans.

    Agency Affected: Department of Labor

    Status: Open

    Comments: The Department of Labor (Labor) submitted an updated consolidation plan in September 2011. However, while the plan provided complete information on qualitative impacts, consolidation approach, and risk management, it provided only partial information on consolidation scope and a high-level timeline, and did not provide information on performance metrics, a master program schedule, or cost savings. Subsequently, in March 2013, the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) issued a memorandum that made significant changes to the Federal Data Center Consolidation Initiative's reporting requirements, including eliminating the requirement for agencies (including Labor) to submit the previously required data center consolidation plans. Rather, starting in May 2013, agencies were to begin submitting data center consolidation information to OMB via three primary means--an information resources management strategic plan, an enterprise road map, and an integrated data collection channel. After agencies fully implement OMB's new reporting requirements, which is expected in February 2014, we will review the extent to which the information submitted by Labor includes elements required by the reporting structure. Regarding Labor's data center inventory, as of June 2013, the department's updated inventory provided complete information on physical servers, virtualization, and network storage, but provided incomplete information on other key elements, such as power capacity and facility staffing. We will continue to evaluate Labor's progress in implementing this recommendation.

    Recommendation: The secretaries and agency heads of the Departments of Agriculture, Commerce, Defense, Education, Energy, Health and Human Services, Homeland Security, Interior, Justice, Labor, State, Transportation, Treasury, and Veterans Affairs; the Environmental Protection Agency, the General Services Administration, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration, the National Science Foundation, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission, the Office of Personnel Management, the Small Business Administration, the Social Security Administration, and the U.S. Agency for International Development should direct their component agencies and their data center consolidation program managers to complete the missing elements in their respective data center consolidation inventories and plans.

    Agency Affected: Small Business Administration

    Status: Open

    Comments: The Small Business Administration (SBA) submitted an updated consolidation plan in September 2011. However, while the agency's consolidation plan provided complete information on consolidation approach, consolidation scope, consolidation timeline, and a communications plan, it provided only partial information on SBA's savings and utilization goals and did not provide information on performance metrics, a cost-benefit analysis, or a master program schedule. Subsequently, in March 2013, the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) issued a memorandum that made significant changes to the Federal Data Center Consolidation Initiative's reporting requirements, including eliminating the requirement for agencies (including SBA) to submit the previously required data center consolidation plans. Rather, starting in May 2013, agencies were to begin submitting data center consolidation information to OMB via three primary means--an information resources management strategic plan, an enterprise road map, and an integrated data collection channel. After agencies fully implement OMB's new reporting requirements, which is expected in February 2014, we will review the extent to which the information submitted by SBA includes elements required by the reporting structure. Regarding SBA's data center inventory, as of June 2013, the department's updated inventory provided only partial information on key elements such as physical servers, virtualization, data center power capacity and electricity usage, network storage, and facility staffing. We will continue to evaluate SBA's progress in implementing this recommendation.

    Recommendation: The secretaries and agency heads of the Departments of Agriculture, Commerce, Defense, Education, Energy, Health and Human Services, Homeland Security, Interior, Justice, Labor, State, Transportation, Treasury, and Veterans Affairs; the Environmental Protection Agency, the General Services Administration, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration, the National Science Foundation, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission, the Office of Personnel Management, the Small Business Administration, the Social Security Administration, and the U.S. Agency for International Development should direct their component agencies and their data center consolidation program managers to complete the missing elements in their respective data center consolidation inventories and plans.

    Agency Affected: Environmental Protection Agency

    Status: Open

    Comments: The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) submitted an updated consolidation plan in September 2011. However, while the agency's consolidation plan provided complete information on goals, consolidation approach, consolidation scope, performance metrics, and risk management, it provided only partial information on a cost-benefit analysis and did not provide information on a master program schedule. Subsequently, in March 2013, the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) issued a memorandum that made significant changes to the Federal Data Center Consolidation Initiative's reporting requirements, including eliminating the requirement for agencies (including EPA) to submit the previously required data center consolidation plans. Rather, starting in May 2013, agencies were to begin submitting data center consolidation information to OMB via three primary means--an information resources management strategic plan, an enterprise road map, and an integrated data collection channel. After agencies fully implement OMB's new reporting requirements, which is expected in February 2014, we will review the extent to which the information submitted by EPA includes elements required by the reporting structure. Regarding EPA's data center inventory, as of June 2013, the agency's updated inventory provided complete information on physical servers, virtualization, and network storage, but only partial information on other key elements such as data center power capacity and facility staffing. We will continue to evaluate EPA's progress in implementing this recommendation.

    Recommendation: The secretaries and agency heads of the Departments of Agriculture, Commerce, Defense, Education, Energy, Health and Human Services, Homeland Security, Interior, Justice, Labor, State, Transportation, Treasury, and Veterans Affairs; the Environmental Protection Agency, the General Services Administration, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration, the National Science Foundation, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission, the Office of Personnel Management, the Small Business Administration, the Social Security Administration, and the U.S. Agency for International Development should direct their component agencies and their data center consolidation program managers to complete the missing elements in their respective data center consolidation inventories and plans.

    Agency Affected: National Aeronautics and Space Administration

    Status: Open

    Comments: The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) submitted an updated consolidation plan in September 2011. However, while the agency's consolidation plan provided complete information on goals, consolidation approach, consolidation scope, performance metrics, and risk management, it provided only partial information on consolidation progress and savings and did not provide a cost-benefit analysis. Subsequently, in March 2013, the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) issued a memorandum that made significant changes to the Federal Data Center Consolidation Initiative's reporting requirements, including eliminating the requirement for agencies (including NASA) to submit the previously required data center consolidation plans. Rather, starting in May 2013, agencies were to begin submitting data center consolidation information to OMB via three primary means--an information resources management strategic plan, an enterprise road map, and an integrated data collection channel. After agencies fully implement OMB's new reporting requirements, which is expected in February 2014, we will review the extent to which the information submitted by NASA includes elements required by the reporting structure. Regarding NASA's data center inventory, as of June 2013, the department's updated inventory provided complete information on physical servers, virtualization, and network storage, but only partial information on other key elements such as data center power capacity, electricity usage, and facility staffing. We will continue to evaluate NASA's progress in implementing this recommendation.

    Recommendation: The secretaries and agency heads of the Departments of Agriculture, Commerce, Defense, Education, Energy, Health and Human Services, Homeland Security, Interior, Justice, Labor, State, Transportation, Treasury, and Veterans Affairs; the Environmental Protection Agency, the General Services Administration, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration, the National Science Foundation, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission, the Office of Personnel Management, the Small Business Administration, the Social Security Administration, and the U.S. Agency for International Development should direct their component agencies and their data center consolidation program managers to complete the missing elements in their respective data center consolidation inventories and plans.

    Agency Affected: Department of Transportation

    Status: Open

    Comments: The Department of Transportation (Transportation) submitted an updated consolidation plan in September 2011. However, while the department's consolidation plan provided complete information on quantitative goals, consolidation approach, consolidation scope, performance metrics, and risk management, it did not provide a master program schedule or cost-benefit analysis. Subsequently, in March 2013, the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) issued a memorandum that made significant changes to the Federal Data Center Consolidation Initiative's reporting requirements, including eliminating the requirement for agencies (including Transportation) to submit the previously required data center consolidation plans. Rather, starting in May 2013, agencies were to begin submitting data center consolidation information to OMB via three primary means--an information resources management strategic plan, an enterprise road map, and an integrated data collection channel. After agencies fully implement OMB's new reporting requirements, which is expected in February 2014, we will review the extent to which the information submitted by Transportation includes elements required by the reporting structure. Regarding Transportation's data center inventory, as of June 2013, the department's updated inventory provided complete information on physical servers, virtualization, and network storage, but only partial information on other key elements such as data center power capacity, electricity usage, and facility staffing. We will continue to evaluate Transportation's progress in implementing this recommendation.

    Recommendation: The secretaries and agency heads of the Departments of Agriculture, Commerce, Defense, Education, Energy, Health and Human Services, Homeland Security, Interior, Justice, Labor, State, Transportation, Treasury, and Veterans Affairs; the Environmental Protection Agency, the General Services Administration, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration, the National Science Foundation, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission, the Office of Personnel Management, the Small Business Administration, the Social Security Administration, and the U.S. Agency for International Development should direct their component agencies and their data center consolidation program managers to complete the missing elements in their respective data center consolidation inventories and plans.

    Agency Affected: Department of Veterans Affairs

    Status: Open

    Comments: The Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) submitted an updated consolidation plan in September 2011. However, while the department's consolidation plan provided complete information on goals, consolidation approach, consolidation scope, performance metrics, and a master program schedule, it provided only partial information on a cost-benefit analysis and did not provide information on consolidation cost savings. Subsequently, in March 2013, the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) issued a memorandum that made significant changes to the Federal Data Center Consolidation Initiative's reporting requirements, including eliminating the requirement for agencies (including VA) to submit the previously required data center consolidation plans. Rather, starting in May 2013, agencies were to begin submitting data center consolidation information to OMB via three primary means--an information resources management strategic plan, an enterprise road map, and an integrated data collection channel. After agencies fully implement OMB's new reporting requirements, which is expected in February 2014, we will review the extent to which the information submitted by VA includes elements required by the reporting structure. Regarding VA's data center inventory, as of June 2013, the department's updated inventory provided complete information on physical servers, virtualization, and network storage, but only partial information on other key elements such as electricity usage and facility staffing. We will continue to evaluate VA's progress in implementing this recommendation.

    Recommendation: The secretaries and agency heads of the Departments of Agriculture, Commerce, Defense, Education, Energy, Health and Human Services, Homeland Security, Interior, Justice, Labor, State, Transportation, Treasury, and Veterans Affairs; the Environmental Protection Agency, the General Services Administration, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration, the National Science Foundation, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission, the Office of Personnel Management, the Small Business Administration, the Social Security Administration, and the U.S. Agency for International Development should direct their component agencies and their data center consolidation program managers to complete the missing elements in their respective data center consolidation inventories and plans.

    Agency Affected: Department of Defense

    Status: Open

    Comments: The Department of Defense (Defense) submitted an updated consolidation plan in November 2011. However, while the plan provided complete information on the department's qualitative impacts, consolidation approach, and performance metrics, it did not provide information on the department's consolidation scope, high-level consolidation timeline, master program schedule, or cost-benefit analysis. Subsequently, in March 2013, the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) issued a memorandum that made significant changes to the Federal Data Center Consolidation Initiative's reporting requirements, including eliminating the requirement for agencies (including Defense) to submit the previously required data center consolidation plans. Rather, starting in May 2013, agencies were to begin submitting data center consolidation information to OMB via three primary means--an information resources management strategic plan, an enterprise road map, and an integrated data collection channel. After agencies fully implement OMB's new reporting requirements, which is expected in February 2014, we will review the extent to which the information submitted by Defense includes elements required by the reporting structure. Regarding Defense's data center inventory, as of June 2013, the department's updated inventory provided complete information on physical servers and virtualization, but provided incomplete information on other key elements, such as power capacity, energy usage, network storage, and facility staffing. We will continue to evaluate Defense's progress in implementing this recommendation.

    Recommendation: The secretaries and agency heads of the Departments of Agriculture, Commerce, Defense, Education, Energy, Health and Human Services, Homeland Security, Interior, Justice, Labor, State, Transportation, Treasury, and Veterans Affairs; the Environmental Protection Agency, the General Services Administration, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration, the National Science Foundation, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission, the Office of Personnel Management, the Small Business Administration, the Social Security Administration, and the U.S. Agency for International Development should require their data center consolidation program managers to consider consolidation challenges and lessons learned when updating their consolidation plans.

    Agency Affected: Department of Justice

    Status: Closed - Implemented

    Comments: The Department of Justice submitted an updated consolidation plan in September 2011 and this plan discusses consolidation challenges and lessons learned. For example, the plan discusses funding challenges, the need to implement change to efficiently address consolidation, and the challenges of consolidating in a federated organization. Further, the plan addresses the department's interaction with other government and commercial organizations to build knowledge and leverage consolidation lessons learned.

    Recommendation: The secretaries and agency heads of the Departments of Agriculture, Commerce, Defense, Education, Energy, Health and Human Services, Homeland Security, Interior, Justice, Labor, State, Transportation, Treasury, and Veterans Affairs; the Environmental Protection Agency, the General Services Administration, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration, the National Science Foundation, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission, the Office of Personnel Management, the Small Business Administration, the Social Security Administration, and the U.S. Agency for International Development should require their data center consolidation program managers to consider consolidation challenges and lessons learned when updating their consolidation plans.

    Agency Affected: Department of Agriculture

    Status: Open

    Comments: The Department of Agriculture (Agriculture) submitted an updated consolidation plan in September 2011. However, while the plan discussed consolidation lessons learned, such as forming a dedicated team to migrate and close data centers, it did not discuss consolidation challenges. Subsequently, in March 2013, the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) issued a memorandum that made significant changes to the Federal Data Center Consolidation Initiative's reporting requirements, including eliminating the requirement for agencies (including Agriculture) to submit the previously required data center consolidation plans. Rather, starting in May 2013, agencies were to begin submitting data center consolidation information to OMB via three primary means--an information resources management strategic plan, an enterprise road map, and an integrated data collection channel. After agencies fully implement OMB's new reporting requirements, which is expected in February 2014, we will review the extent to which the information submitted by Agriculture considers data center consolidation challenges.

    Recommendation: The secretaries and agency heads of the Departments of Agriculture, Commerce, Defense, Education, Energy, Health and Human Services, Homeland Security, Interior, Justice, Labor, State, Transportation, Treasury, and Veterans Affairs; the Environmental Protection Agency, the General Services Administration, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration, the National Science Foundation, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission, the Office of Personnel Management, the Small Business Administration, the Social Security Administration, and the U.S. Agency for International Development should require their data center consolidation program managers to consider consolidation challenges and lessons learned when updating their consolidation plans.

    Agency Affected: National Science Foundation

    Status: Open

    Comments: The National Science Foundation (NSF) submitted an updated consolidation plan in September 2011. However, while the plan discussed how NSF would research and integrate acquisition lessons learned from data center consolidations and other similar implementations from the government and the private sector into its approaches, it did not discuss consolidation challenges. An agency official stated that future plans will more explicitly discuss consolidation challenges. Subsequently, in March 2013, the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) issued a memorandum that made significant changes to the Federal Data Center Consolidation Initiative's reporting requirements, including eliminating the requirement for agencies (including SSA) to submit the previously required data center consolidation plans. Rather, starting in May 2013, agencies were to begin submitting data center consolidation information to OMB via three primary means--an information resources management strategic plan, an enterprise road map, and an integrated data collection channel. After agencies fully implement OMB's new reporting requirements, which is expected in February 2014, we will review the extent to which the information submitted by NSF considers data center consolidation challenges.

    Recommendation: The secretaries and agency heads of the Departments of Agriculture, Commerce, Defense, Education, Energy, Health and Human Services, Homeland Security, Interior, Justice, Labor, State, Transportation, Treasury, and Veterans Affairs; the Environmental Protection Agency, the General Services Administration, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration, the National Science Foundation, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission, the Office of Personnel Management, the Small Business Administration, the Social Security Administration, and the U.S. Agency for International Development should direct their component agencies and their data center consolidation program managers to complete the missing elements in their respective data center consolidation inventories and plans.

    Agency Affected: Nuclear Regulatory Commission

    Status: Open

    Comments: The Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) submitted an updated consolidation plan in September 2011. However, while the agency's consolidation plan provided complete information on consolidation approach, consolidation scope, consolidation timeline, and risk management, it provided only partial information on utilization goals and a cost-benefit analysis and did not provide information on performance metrics or a master program schedule. Subsequently, in March 2013, the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) issued a memorandum that made significant changes to the Federal Data Center Consolidation Initiative's reporting requirements, including eliminating the requirement for agencies (including NRC) to submit the previously required data center consolidation plans. Rather, starting in May 2013, agencies were to begin submitting data center consolidation information to OMB via three primary means--an information resources management strategic plan, an enterprise road map, and an integrated data collection channel. After agencies fully implement OMB's new reporting requirements, which is expected in February 2014, we will review the extent to which the information submitted by NRC includes elements required by the reporting structure. Regarding NRC's data center inventory, as of June 2013, the department's updated inventory provided complete information on physical servers, virtualization, IT facilities and energy, and network storage, but only partial information on facility staffing and related costs. We will continue to evaluate NRC's progress in implementing this recommendation.

    Recommendation: The secretaries and agency heads of the Departments of Agriculture, Commerce, Defense, Education, Energy, Health and Human Services, Homeland Security, Interior, Justice, Labor, State, Transportation, Treasury, and Veterans Affairs; the Environmental Protection Agency, the General Services Administration, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration, the National Science Foundation, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission, the Office of Personnel Management, the Small Business Administration, the Social Security Administration, and the U.S. Agency for International Development should direct their component agencies and their data center consolidation program managers to complete the missing elements in their respective data center consolidation inventories and plans.

    Agency Affected: Department of State

    Status: Open

    Comments: The Department of State (State) submitted an updated consolidation plan in September 2011. However, while the department's consolidation plan provided complete information on consolidation approach, scope, timeline, and performance metrics, it provided only partial information on quantitative goals and cost savings. Subsequently, in March 2013, the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) issued a memorandum that made significant changes to the Federal Data Center Consolidation Initiative's reporting requirements, including eliminating the requirement for agencies (including State) to submit the previously required data center consolidation plans. Rather, starting in May 2013, agencies were to begin submitting data center consolidation information to OMB via three primary means--an information resources management strategic plan, an enterprise road map, and an integrated data collection channel. After agencies fully implement OMB's new reporting requirements, which is expected in February 2014, we will review the extent to which the information submitted by State includes elements required by the reporting structure. Regarding State's data center inventory, as of June 2013, the department's updated inventory provided complete information on virtualization, but provided incomplete information on other key elements, such as rack counts, storage capacity, power capacity, electricity usage, and facility staffing. We will continue to evaluate State's progress in implementing this recommendation.

    Recommendation: The secretaries and agency heads of the Departments of Agriculture, Commerce, Defense, Education, Energy, Health and Human Services, Homeland Security, Interior, Justice, Labor, State, Transportation, Treasury, and Veterans Affairs; the Environmental Protection Agency, the General Services Administration, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration, the National Science Foundation, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission, the Office of Personnel Management, the Small Business Administration, the Social Security Administration, and the U.S. Agency for International Development should require their data center consolidation program managers to consider consolidation challenges and lessons learned when updating their consolidation plans.

    Agency Affected: Nuclear Regulatory Commission

    Status: Closed - Implemented

    Comments: The Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) submitted an updated consolidation plan in September 2011, and the plan discusses both consolidation challenges and lessons learned. Specifically, the plan discusses challenges related to budgeting, resources, and managing the level of coordination required given the number of internal and external entities involved in facilities, data center, and IT planning. The plan also states that NRC uses lessons learned and best practices from states and other Federal agencies, as well as private industry.

    Recommendation: The secretaries and agency heads of the Departments of Agriculture, Commerce, Defense, Education, Energy, Health and Human Services, Homeland Security, Interior, Justice, Labor, State, Transportation, Treasury, and Veterans Affairs; the Environmental Protection Agency, the General Services Administration, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration, the National Science Foundation, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission, the Office of Personnel Management, the Small Business Administration, the Social Security Administration, and the U.S. Agency for International Development should require their data center consolidation program managers to consider consolidation challenges and lessons learned when updating their consolidation plans.

    Agency Affected: Department of Defense

    Status: Closed - Implemented

    Comments: The Department of Defense submitted an updated consolidation plan in November 2011 and this plan discusses consolidation challenges and lessons learned. For example, the plan discusses challenges such as continuing budget resolutions delaying the implementation of consolidation plans and funding, as well the required investment in labor, new and more efficient hardware, upgrades to computer facilities, and increased operating costs, associated with consolidation. The plan also discusses lessons learned, such as the value of adopting a strategy to transfer applications and infrastructure to a shared services provider. The plan also discusses the importance of establishing moratorium on the construction of new data centers and hardware acquisition, which when combined with streamlined acquisition practices, have helped rein in the growth of data centers.

    Recommendation: The secretaries and agency heads of the Departments of Agriculture, Commerce, Defense, Education, Energy, Health and Human Services, Homeland Security, Interior, Justice, Labor, State, Transportation, Treasury, and Veterans Affairs; the Environmental Protection Agency, the General Services Administration, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration, the National Science Foundation, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission, the Office of Personnel Management, the Small Business Administration, the Social Security Administration, and the U.S. Agency for International Development should require their data center consolidation program managers to consider consolidation challenges and lessons learned when updating their consolidation plans.

    Agency Affected: Department of Labor

    Status: Open

    Comments: The Department of Labor (Labor) submitted an updated consolidation plan in September 2011. However, while the plan discussed consolidation challenges, such as identifying and quantifying the actual costs associated with the data center facilities and operational support, it did not discuss consolidation lessons learned. A Labor official stated that the department did not yet have much information related to lessons learned. Subsequently, in March 2013, the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) issued a memorandum that made significant changes to the Federal Data Center Consolidation Initiative's reporting requirements, including eliminating the requirement for agencies (including Labor) to submit the previously required data center consolidation plans. Rather, starting in May 2013, agencies were to begin submitting data center consolidation information to OMB via three primary means--an information resources management strategic plan, an enterprise road map, and an integrated data collection channel. After agencies fully implement OMB's new reporting requirements, which is expected in February 2014, we will review the extent to which the information submitted by Labor considers data center consolidation lessons learned.

    Recommendation: The secretaries and agency heads of the Departments of Agriculture, Commerce, Defense, Education, Energy, Health and Human Services, Homeland Security, Interior, Justice, Labor, State, Transportation, Treasury, and Veterans Affairs; the Environmental Protection Agency, the General Services Administration, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration, the National Science Foundation, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission, the Office of Personnel Management, the Small Business Administration, the Social Security Administration, and the U.S. Agency for International Development should require their data center consolidation program managers to consider consolidation challenges and lessons learned when updating their consolidation plans.

    Agency Affected: Department of Transportation

    Status: Open

    Comments: The Department of Transportation (Transportation) submitted an updated consolidation plan in September 2011. However, while the plan discussed such challenges as the lengthy process to identify possible consolidations, present them to management and then to users, and then work the technical side of migrations, and the difficulty of application mapping, it did not discuss lessons learned. Subsequently, in March 2013, the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) issued a memorandum that made significant changes to the Federal Data Center Consolidation Initiative's reporting requirements, including eliminating the requirement for agencies (including Transportation) to submit the previously required data center consolidation plans. Rather, starting in May 2013, agencies were to begin submitting data center consolidation information to OMB via three primary means--an information resources management strategic plan, an enterprise road map, and an integrated data collection channel. After agencies fully implement OMB's new reporting requirements, which is expected in February 2014, we will review the extent to which the information submitted by Transportation includes information about lessons learned.

    Recommendation: The secretaries and agency heads of the Departments of Agriculture, Commerce, Defense, Education, Energy, Health and Human Services, Homeland Security, Interior, Justice, Labor, State, Transportation, Treasury, and Veterans Affairs; the Environmental Protection Agency, the General Services Administration, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration, the National Science Foundation, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission, the Office of Personnel Management, the Small Business Administration, the Social Security Administration, and the U.S. Agency for International Development should require their data center consolidation program managers to consider consolidation challenges and lessons learned when updating their consolidation plans.

    Agency Affected: Department of the Interior

    Status: Closed - Implemented

    Comments: The Department of the Interior submitted an updated consolidation plan in September 2011 and this plan discusses consolidation challenges and lessons learned. For example, the plan discusses procedural and cultural challenges relating to consolidation, as well as challenges related to validating and implementing organizational change. Further, the plan discusses lessons learned about the complexities and constraints related to cross-component hosting and migration, data center cost drivers and limitations of legacy accounting systems and processes, and aligning infrastructure refresh with consolidation needs at the component organization level.

    Recommendation: The secretaries and agency heads of the Departments of Agriculture, Commerce, Defense, Education, Energy, Health and Human Services, Homeland Security, Interior, Justice, Labor, State, Transportation, Treasury, and Veterans Affairs; the Environmental Protection Agency, the General Services Administration, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration, the National Science Foundation, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission, the Office of Personnel Management, the Small Business Administration, the Social Security Administration, and the U.S. Agency for International Development should require their data center consolidation program managers to consider consolidation challenges and lessons learned when updating their consolidation plans.

    Agency Affected: Department of State

    Status: Closed - Implemented

    Comments: The Department of State submitted an updated consolidation plan in September 2011 and this plan discusses consolidation challenges and lessons learned. For example, the plan discusses a primary consolidation challenge of balancing resources between equipment operation and consolidation and the relationship of this issue to securing and prioritizing funding. The plan also discusses lessons learned related to customer outreach and focusing on data center-by-data center closure.

    Recommendation: The secretaries and agency heads of the Departments of Agriculture, Commerce, Defense, Education, Energy, Health and Human Services, Homeland Security, Interior, Justice, Labor, State, Transportation, Treasury, and Veterans Affairs; the Environmental Protection Agency, the General Services Administration, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration, the National Science Foundation, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission, the Office of Personnel Management, the Small Business Administration, the Social Security Administration, and the U.S. Agency for International Development should require their data center consolidation program managers to consider consolidation challenges and lessons learned when updating their consolidation plans.

    Agency Affected: Department of Health and Human Services

    Status: Closed - Implemented

    Comments: The Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) submitted an updated consolidation plan in September 2011 and this plan discusses consolidation challenges and lessons learned. For example, the plan discusses the difficulty with projecting electricity cost savings because of the very small percentage of HHS data centers that are currently metered to measure electricity usage and that this number was insufficient for projecting corresponding cost savings with any degree of confidence. Further, the plan notes that the department has evaluated lessons learned from the implementation of previous consolidations and incorporated that evaluation into a model to calculate the projected cost benefits to be achieved from consolidating HHS data centers.

    Recommendation: The secretaries and agency heads of the Departments of Agriculture, Commerce, Defense, Education, Energy, Health and Human Services, Homeland Security, Interior, Justice, Labor, State, Transportation, Treasury, and Veterans Affairs; the Environmental Protection Agency, the General Services Administration, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration, the National Science Foundation, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission, the Office of Personnel Management, the Small Business Administration, the Social Security Administration, and the U.S. Agency for International Development should require their data center consolidation program managers to consider consolidation challenges and lessons learned when updating their consolidation plans.

    Agency Affected: United States Agency for International Development

    Status: Open

    Comments: The U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID) submitted an updated consolidation plan in October 2011, but the plan did not discuss consolidation challenges or lessons learned. Subsequently, in March 2013, the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) issued a memorandum that made significant changes to the Federal Data Center Consolidation Initiative's reporting requirements, including eliminating the requirement for agencies (including USAID) to submit the previously required data center consolidation plans. Rather, starting in May 2013, agencies were to begin submitting data center consolidation information to OMB via three primary means--an information resources management strategic plan, an enterprise road map, and an integrated data collection channel. After agencies fully implement OMB's new reporting requirements, which is expected in February 2014, we will review the extent to which the information submitted by USAID considers data center consolidation challenges and lessons learned.

    Recommendation: The secretaries and agency heads of the Departments of Agriculture, Commerce, Defense, Education, Energy, Health and Human Services, Homeland Security, Interior, Justice, Labor, State, Transportation, Treasury, and Veterans Affairs; the Environmental Protection Agency, the General Services Administration, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration, the National Science Foundation, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission, the Office of Personnel Management, the Small Business Administration, the Social Security Administration, and the U.S. Agency for International Development should require their data center consolidation program managers to consider consolidation challenges and lessons learned when updating their consolidation plans.

    Agency Affected: Social Security Administration

    Status: Open

    Comments: The Social Security Administration (SSA) submitted an updated consolidation plan in October 2011, but the plan did not discuss consolidation challenges or lessons learned. Subsequently, in March 2013, the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) issued a memorandum that made significant changes to the Federal Data Center Consolidation Initiative's reporting requirements, including eliminating the requirement for agencies (including SSA) to submit the previously required data center consolidation plans. Rather, starting in May 2013, agencies were to begin submitting data center consolidation information to OMB via three primary means--an information resources management strategic plan, an enterprise road map, and an integrated data collection channel. After agencies fully implement OMB's new reporting requirements, which is expected in February 2014, we will review the extent to which the information submitted by SSA considers data center consolidation challenges and lessons learned.

    Recommendation: The secretaries and agency heads of the Departments of Agriculture, Commerce, Defense, Education, Energy, Health and Human Services, Homeland Security, Interior, Justice, Labor, State, Transportation, Treasury, and Veterans Affairs; the Environmental Protection Agency, the General Services Administration, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration, the National Science Foundation, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission, the Office of Personnel Management, the Small Business Administration, the Social Security Administration, and the U.S. Agency for International Development should require their data center consolidation program managers to consider consolidation challenges and lessons learned when updating their consolidation plans.

    Agency Affected: General Services Administration

    Status: Closed - Implemented

    Comments: The General Services Administration (GSA) submitted an updated consolidation plan in September 2011, and the plan discusses both consolidation challenges and lessons learned. Specifically, the plan discusses such construction challenges as vendors not meeting schedules, non-responsive vendors, and IT equipment delivery delays. The plan also describes how lessons learned from data center organization allowed GSA to realize greater space and energy efficiencies.

    Recommendation: The secretaries and agency heads of the Departments of Agriculture, Commerce, Defense, Education, Energy, Health and Human Services, Homeland Security, Interior, Justice, Labor, State, Transportation, Treasury, and Veterans Affairs; the Environmental Protection Agency, the General Services Administration, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration, the National Science Foundation, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission, the Office of Personnel Management, the Small Business Administration, the Social Security Administration, and the U.S. Agency for International Development should require their data center consolidation program managers to consider consolidation challenges and lessons learned when updating their consolidation plans.

    Agency Affected: Department of Commerce

    Status: Closed - Implemented

    Comments: The Department of Commerce submitted an updated consolidation plan in September 2011 and this plan discusses consolidation challenges, as well as lessons learned. For example, the plan discusses challenges such as providing complete inventory information and deploying shared services, and also discusses the accompanying lessons learned of the need for full power metering and the importance of reviewing inventory data, as well as fully defining and understanding shared services requirements.

    Recommendation: The secretaries and agency heads of the Departments of Agriculture, Commerce, Defense, Education, Energy, Health and Human Services, Homeland Security, Interior, Justice, Labor, State, Transportation, Treasury, and Veterans Affairs; the Environmental Protection Agency, the General Services Administration, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration, the National Science Foundation, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission, the Office of Personnel Management, the Small Business Administration, the Social Security Administration, and the U.S. Agency for International Development should require their data center consolidation program managers to consider consolidation challenges and lessons learned when updating their consolidation plans.

    Agency Affected: Department of Energy

    Status: Closed - Implemented

    Comments: The Department of Energy submitted an updated consolidation plan in September 2011 and this plan discusses consolidation challenges and lessons learned. For example, the plan discusses the need for significant upfront investment to implement consolidation, which can be difficult as budgets continue to be reduced. Further, the plan discusses consolidation lessons learned, such as the need to assign a certified Data Center Energy Practitioner to each facility who is responsible for the accuracy of data calls and tracking and reporting on consolidation activities. The plan also discusses the establishment of a data center dashboard system to address conflicting interpretation of data call criteria. This dashboard allows the department to report consistent metrics, project status and other data without maintaining multiple data sources.

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